4 Myths that Prevent People from Getting Started with Sudoku

4 Myths that Prevent People from Getting Started with Sudoku

Unfortunately, some people get the mistaken impression that Sudoku is not for them. Some people feel like only certain types of people, or certain mindsets of people, are a good fit to play Sudoku.

This could not be farther from the truth! Sudoku is a game for everyone. Don’t let these myths and misconceptions about the game hold you back from getting started with Sudoku.

Here are the top 4 myths that keep people from getting started with Sudoku:

Only “Smart” and Highly Educated People Can Play Sudoku

Sudoku is widely known as a “brain game,” but that doesn’t mean you have to be highly educated to play it. Sudoku is not just for “brainiacs” and nerds; it’s for anyone who enjoys the challenge of a fun, stimulating game and who loves to strengthen their brain “muscles” by using their logical problem solving skills.

Sudoku is great for kids, college students, adults, and seniors – people of all ages and all education levels can benefit from the challenging mental exercises of Sudoku. You might find yourself feeling “smarter” and more mentally sharp by playing Sudoku.

You Have to Be Good at Math to Play Sudoku

Sudoku is a game of numbers, but it’s not really a “numbers game.” You don’t need to do any math problems to solve Sudoku puzzle, you don’t need arithmetic, and you don’t need any high-level math education.

Even if you struggled with match classes in school, you can excel at Sudoku, because Sudoku is not about math – it’s about logic and deductive reasoning and spotting patterns in the grid.

The Rules of Sudoku Are Too Hard to Understand

Sudoku might seem like a complicated game when you’re first learning to play it, but the rules of Sudoku are surprisingly simple: There are 9 numbers in each row, column and square – you need to fill in the blank spaces without repeating any numbers within each row, column or square. That’s it! Simple.

You Need Pencil and Paper to Play Sudoku

In the early days of Sudoku’s rising popularity as a puzzle game, most people played Sudoku on paper. Small pocket-sized Sudoku books and crossword-style Sudoku puzzles in newspapers were a common sight on subway trains in big cities.

But today, people can play Sudoku online. You can even play Sudoku on mobile devices by using mobile apps. The old days of pen and paper Sudoku are gone – so why not use the latest technology to give Sudoku a try?